Sunday, October 31, 2010

Aubrie Cox - Three Questions

Aubrie Cox is an English literature and creative writing student at Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois. At Millikin, she serves as the editor-in-chief for the literary and fine arts magazine Collage, and senior editor for the student-run press, Bronze Man Books. She first encountered haiku in the spring of 2008 when she took Dr. Randy Brooks' course, Global Haiku Traditions. Since then, Aubrie has been independently writing and studying haiku and related forms. Her poetry has appeared in online and print publications such as Modern Haiku, The Heron's Nest, bottle rockets, and Notes From the Gean.



1) Why do you write haiku?

I feel like that's like asking, 'Why do you breathe?' I just do it...it happens. I no longer have the time to sit down and write out long journal entries about my days or inner thoughts, but I can always scribble a haiku onto a post-it or type it out on my iPod Touch while walking to class. I compose and edit in my head while driving to and from school. While the Midwest is not the most exciting place to live, it's down to earth with a distinct flavor of humility (politics aside), which makes it ideal for haiku.

Oftentimes once I have figured out the answer or how to do something, I grow bored and move on to tackle the next challenge. Haiku continuously challenges and invigorates me such that I can't imagine my life without it. I value the craft of the illusion of spontaneity, and the exchange between reader and writer, both of which are embodied in haiku. Although compact on the surface, I'm always exploring new depths and resonances. Mum calls haiku my 'bliss,' even though she thinks this also makes me a geek.

2) What other poetic forms do you enjoy?

I used to write longer forms--form and free verse--though these days end up with only bits and pieces of uncompleted work. I have, however, taken interest in photo haiga. My approach to haiku and photography reflect one another, so I enjoy it when I can combine the two and/or collaborate with other poets to combine image and poetry. I love composing rengay and other linked verse with friends that I've taught haiku. On occasion I write tanka, though I wouldn't necessarily say that I enjoy it (as much as haiku). While I crank out a haibun on an even rarer occasion, the combination of poetry and prose in general fascinates me.

3) Of the many wonderful haiku you've written, what do you consider to be your top three?

I don't know if they can be deemed wonderful, but these are three I particularly enjoy.



harvest moon
rises above the branches
tea's aftertaste

bottle rockets 11.2, February 2010



father-daughter talk
my fishing lure
caught in the moon

tinywords 10.2, July 2010



school desk
one name carved
deeper than the rest

The Heron's Nest 12.2, June 2010



If you've been enjoying this weekly series and have not contributed, please consider sharing your response (whether it be for haiku or tanka) to the three little questions that Aubrie answered. You must be a published poet to participate.

3 comments:

Pris said...

I really enjoyed this interview as I said earlier on Facebook, too!

Terri L. French said...

Aubrie, so good too find you here. If you are a geek, at least you are a blissful one! I particularly enjoyed the father-daughter haiku.

Alan Summers said...

Hi Aubrie,

I really liked this comment of your's:

"I no longer have the time to sit down and write out long journal entries about my days or inner thoughts, but I can always scribble a haiku onto a post-it or type it out on my iPod Touch while walking to class.

and

"I grow bored and move on to tackle the next challenge. Haiku continuously challenges and invigorates me such that I can't imagine my life without it."

These are things I teach about, as haiku is great for journal keeping.

Because of its nature, a person can often remember other things in that day, even if they are reading the entry six months later.

My favourite is your father-daughter haiku, but I enjoyed all three.

all my very best

Alan
2010 With Words Haiku Competition: weblink
.